Is the galling of stainless steel fasteners a problem for you? Learn more here

Galling of stainless steel fasteners can be immensely frustrating and difficult to understand, especially if the fasteners you are using have been inspected to indicate that they are of an acceptable standard. Galling is when the bolt twists off or the bolt’s threads seize up as a result of the protective surface film that these fasteners can self generate becoming damaged or wiped off during the pressure that can build up during fastener tightening.
The problem of galling is often reported when stainless steel fasteners are used in timber structures. Wood emits an acetic acid which can be quite corrosive to common metals. In order to ensure that your fasteners don’t fall victim to the negative impact of this type of corrosion, the market looks to invest in Austenitic stainless steel fasteners which offer a higher and more effective corrosion resistance and therefore limits the potential for galling during fastener tightening.

What is Austenitic stainless steel fasteners used for?

Austenitic stainless steel fasteners are typically used on immersed timber structures. The stainless steel fastener grades that you choose will depend on the conditions of the water that the timber structure is immersed in. Factors that play a deciding role in terms of this include water flow rates, chloride level and temperature and so on. Grade 304 is considered suitable in fresh water situations whereas grade 316 is better suited to water conditions with a high chloride level.
If you are looking for a way in which to avoid thread galling when using stainless steel fasteners on timber structures that are immersed in water, take the time to chat to our professional team about our product range. We are dedicated to ensuring that our clients are provided with access to a wide range of stainless steel fastener products that are of an exceptional quality and offer undeniable durability. Contact us for further information and advice at Marsh Fasteners today.

Comments are closed.

Share This